FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH OF ORANGE

IN 1879 THE REV. ANDREW PEDDY HELPED ORGANIZE THIS CONGREGATION WITH 18 CHARTER MEMBERS. THEY MET IN THE FRAME ORANGE COUNTY COURTHOUSE AND WERE SERVED FOR A TIME BY MISSIONARY PREACHERS. SARAH A. FINCH AND ANNA AND LL. BETTIS DEEDED A LOT IN THIS BLOCK TO THE CONGREGATION IN 1883. THE FOLLOWING YEAR A 40' BY 60' MEETING HOUSE WAS ERECTED. IN 1889, DURING THE MINISTRY OF THE REV. J.T. STANTON, THE CONGREGATION ADOPTED THE NAME "GREEN AVENUE BAPTIST CHURCH".  THIS MEMBERSHIP MERGED IN 1909 WITH THE EIGHTH STREET BAPTIST CHURCH TO BECOME "THE FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH OF ORANGE".  UNDER THE LEADERSHIP OF THE REV. J. STUART PEARCE, MORE LAND WAS ACQUIRED IN 1913 AND THIS BRICK SANCTUARY WAS IN USE BY 1915. J.G. MCMULLEN GAVE ADDITIONAL PROPERTY FOR A NEW EDUCATION BUILDING IN 1939.  AS THE CONGREGATION GREW UNDER THE PASTORATE OF DR. COOPER WATERS, ADDITIONAL LAND WAS PURCHASED AND A SECOND EDUCATION BUILDING WAS CONSTRUCTED IN 1952. THE VIOLA MCCORQUODALE BUILDING AND FELLOWSHIP HALL WERE ERECTED IN 1958. THIS FELLOWSHIP HAS HELPED ESTABLISH THE FOLLOWING CHURCHES:  COVE, LITTLE CYPRESS, BROWNWOOD, RIVERSIDE AND MAPLECREST. 

LOCATION:  602 GREEN AVENUE

 

 

LUTCHER MEMORIAL CHURCH

 BUILDING FOUNDED IN 1878, THE FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH INITIALLY OCCUPIED A FRAME STRUCTURE BUILT IN 1883 AT MARKET AND POLK STREET.  IN 1912 THE CONGREGATION MOVED TO THIS CHURCH BUILDING WHICH FRANCES ANN (MRS. HENRY JACOB) LUTCHER (1841-1924) HAD ERECTED AS A GIFT FROM THE LUTCHER FAMILY. H.J. LUTCHER (1836-1912) AMASSED A FORTUNE IN THE LUTCHER AND MOORE LUMBER COMPANY. THE LUTCHER'S AND THEIR TWO DAUGHTERS CARRIE (MRS. E.W.) BROWN AND MIRIAM (MRS. WILLIAM H.) STARK WERE PHILANTHROPISTS AND COMMUNITY LEADERS. MRS. LUTCHER ASKED THAT THE COST OF THE BUILDING NEVER BE PUBLICIZED.  SHE AND HER DESCENDANTS SET UP A PERMANENT ENDOWMENT TO MAINTAIN THE FACILITY.  FINE WORKMANSHIP AND MATERIALS APPEAR THROUGHOUT THE STRUCTURE.  THE BEAUTIFUL ART GLASS WINDOWS WERE MADE BY LAMB STUDIOS OF NEW YORK. FOR THE UPPER FOYER, MRS. LUTCHER CHOSE THREE PRIZEWINNING WINDOWS FROM THE 1893 CHICAGO WORLD'S FAIR.  THE MARBLE CAME FROM ITALY AND THE GRANITE WAS SHIPPED BY RAIL FROM LLANO, TEXAS. THE DOME IS TOPPED BY A COPPER CUPOLA. DECORATIONS ON THE SANCTUARY CEILING AND WALLS HAVE GOLD LEAF OVERLEAF.  THE PEWS AND WOOD PANELING IN THE ORGAN LOFT ARE MAHOGANY.  MOSAIC WORK ADORNS THE PULPIT, MARBLE COMMUNION TABLE AND BAPTISMAL FONT.

LOCATION:  902 W. GREEN AVENUE

 

 

B.H. NORSWORTHY
 (NOV. 26, 1838 - FEB. 21, 1901)

ALABAMA NATIVE B.H. NORSWORTHY MIGRATED TO TEXAS IN 1860.  DURING THE CIVIL WAR HE ORGANIZED A CONFEDERATE UNIT KNOWN AS THE LONE STAR RIFLES. WOUNDED AT THE BATTLE OF THOMPSON'S STATION IN TENNESSEE (1863) AND THE BATTLE OF JONESBORO, GEORGIA (1864), HE ATTAINED THE RANK OF LIEUTENANT COLONEL.  IN THE 1870'S, NORSWORTHY MOVED TO ORANGE WHERE HE WORKED AS A MERCHANT AND A RICE FARMER. HE WAS LATER ELECTED TO THREE TERMS AS MAYOR OF THE CITY.

  LOCATION: EVERGREEN CEMETERY, JACKSON AND BORDER ST., ORANGE

 

 

PUTNAM B. CURRY

A NATIVE OF NEW YORK, PUTNAM B. CURRY MOVED TO GALVESTON IN 1860. HE ENLISTED IN THE CONFEDERATE ARMY AND SAW ACTION ALONG THE TEXAS GULF COAST DURING THE CIVIL WAR (1861-1865). IN 1868 HE MARRIED ELIZA ANN OCHILTREE (1845-1907). THEY HAD FOUR CHILDREN. IN THE LATE 1860'S CURRY SETTLED IN ORANGE AND OPENED A MERCANTILE FIRM; LATER HE RAN A HOTEL AND PUBLISHED A NEWSPAPER. A LEADER IN THE BUSINESS COMMUNITY, CURRY WAS ALSO AN ACTIVE MASON.

LOCATION:

 

 

JEROME SWINFORD

(NOV. 3, 1839-JULY 13, 1906) MISSOURI NATIVE JEROME SWINFORD CAME TO SABINE PASS IN 1859 TO ENTER THE STEAMBOAT BUSINESS.  AFTER SERVING IN THE CIVIL WAR, HE MOVED TO ORANGE WHERE HE WORKED IN ALEXANDER GILMER'S MILL AND LATER BECAME A POPULAR LOCAL MERCHANT.
AN ACTIVE MASON, SWINFORD SERVED AS MAYOR, SCHOOL BOARD MEMBER, AND CITY ALDERMAN.  HE WAS ALSO INSTRUMENTAL IN THE EARLY PLANNING OF A SHIP CHANNEL AT SABINE PASS. IN 1888 HE WAS ELECTED TO THE TEXAS LEGISLATURE.

LOCATION:  EVERGREEN CEMETERY, BORDER AND JACKSON STREETS, ORANGE

 

 

LEONARD FREDERICK BENCKENSTEIN

(MAY 15, 1869-JAN. 30, 1952)A MILLIONAIRE BY HIS EARLY THIRTIES, LEONARD FREDERICK BENCKENSTEIN MADE HIS FIRST FORTUNE IN DETROIT, WHERE HE WAS INVOLVED IN THE INSURANCE, STOCK AND BOND BUSINESS. HIS FRIENDSHIP WITH PROMINENT EAST TEXAS LUMBERMAN JOHN HENRY KIRBY LED HIM TO BEAUMONT, WHERE HE WAS VISITING WHEN THE LUCAS GUSHER CAME IN 1904. BENCKENSTEIN CAME OUT OF RETIREMENT TO BEGIN INVESTING IN THE GREAT SPECULATION THAT FOLLOWED THE OIL DISCOVERY. WHILE INITIALLY SUCCESSFUL, HE EVENTUALLY SUFFERED ENORMOUS LOSSES.  HE REMAINED ACTIVE IN THE OIL BUSINESS, HOWEVER, AND LATER WAS GIVEN A LEASE TO DRILL FOR OIL ON THE GED GRAY RANCH IN CALCASIEU PARISH, LOUISIANA. THE SUCCESSFUL VENTURE RESULTED IN THE FOUNDING OF VINTON PETROLEUM COMPANY, WHICH CAME TO BE OWNED BY BENCKENSTEIN AND ORANGE BUSINESSMEN W.H. STARK AND DR. E.W. BROWN.  AFTER THE DEATH OF HIS FIRST WIFE, GENEVIEVE (PETERSON), IN 1914, BENCKENSTEIN MARRIED LOUISE SNEED, AND THEY MOVED TO ORANGE WHERE HE COULD BETTER MANAGE THE AFFAIRS OF VINTON PETROLEUM.  WHILE LIVING IN THE CITY, HE HELPED ORGANIZE ORANGE'S RED CROSS CHAPTER AND BECAME A BOARD MEMBER OF THE FIRST NATIONAL BANK OF ORANGE.

LOCATION:  STARK PARK, GREEN AVE. AT 6th, ORANGE

 

 

ROBERT B. RUSSELL
(APRIL 1, 1817 - NOV. 29, 1880)

BORN IN MILFORD, CONN.; EMIGRATED TO SAN AUGUSTINE, TEXAS, 1835.  JOINED TEXAN ARMY AND FOUGHT AT SAN JACINTO.  MARRIED LAVINIA BROWNRIGG, JUNE 1, 1841; HAD 6 CHILDREN.  PUBLISHED SAN AUGUSTINE "REDLANDER", 1846-50; MOVED TO SABINE PASS, 1850, THEN ORANGE, 1854.  SERVED AS POSTMASTER OF ORANGE UNDER CONFEDERACY, 1861-65.  ENTERED LUMBER BUSINESS ABOUT 1870, WITH STEAM-OPERATED SHINGLE MILL. PROSPERED UNTIL UNTIMELY DEATH IN MILL ACCIDENT.

LOCATION:  EVERGREEN CEMETERY, S. BORDER AND JACKSON ST., ORANGE

 

 

FIRST NATIONAL BANK OF ORANGE

UNTIL THE INDUSTRIAL REVOLUTION REACHED ORANGE IN THE LATE 1880'S, MOST BANKING NEEDS IN THE AREA WERE HANDLED THROUGH GALVESTON. THE GROWTH OF ORANGE AS A LUMBER CENTER AND DEEP WATER PORT, HOWEVER, NECESSITATED THE DEVELOPMENT OF A LOCAL BANKING FACILITY. THE ORGANIZATIONAL MEETING FOR THE FIRST NATIONAL BANK OF ORANGE WAS HELD IN 1889 AT THE OFFICE OF DR. D.C. HEWSON. A BOARD OF DIRECTORS WAS ELECTED, AND THEIR APPLICATION FOR CHARTER WAS ACCEPTED THE SAME YEAR.  A MAJOR INSTRUMENT IN ORANGE'S GROWTH AS A CENTER FOR THE TIMBER INDUSTRY, THE FIRST NATIONAL BANK WAS ASSOCIATED WITH MANY OF THE TOWN'S PROMINENT LUMBERMEN.  SUCCESSFUL SAWMILL OPERATOR HENRY JACOB LUTCHER (1836-1912) SERVED ON THE BANK'S FIRST BOARD OF DIRECTORS AS ITS PRESIDENT AND BUILT THE INSTITUTION'S FIRST FACILITY AT THE CORNER OF FRONT AND FIFTH STREETS. HIS SONS-IN-LAW, WILLIAM H. STARK (1851-1936) AND DR. EDGAR W. BROWN (1888-1912), ALSO WERE MEMBERS OF THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS. AMONG THE BANK'S INITIAL INVESTORS WERE MERCHANT AND TEXAS LEGISLATURE JEROME SWINFORD AND SHINGLE MILL OWNER LEOPOLD MILLER.  OVER THE YEARS, THE BANK HAS CHANGED LOCATIONS, NAMES AND INVESTORS, BUT IS REMAINS AN IMPORTANT PART OF THE CITY'S COMMERCIAL HERITAGE.

LOCATION:  GREEN AVE. AT 16TH ST. ORANGE

 

 

SAINT PAUL CHRISTIAN METHODIST EPISCOPAL CHURCH

THIS AFRICAN-AMERICAN CONGREGATION HELD INFORMAL WORSHIP SERVICES IN HOMES AND LATER IN A NEARBY BUILDING BEFORE CHURCH TRUSTEES JOSIAH HARDIN, WILLIAM HOLMES, PETER ROGERS, JULIUS SANDERS, AND SILAS HARDIN ACQUIRED A TOWN LOT HERE FOR CHURCH BUILDING PURPOSES IN 1894. THAT YEAR A WOOD FRAME SANCTUARY WAS BUILT AND THE CONGREGATION FORMALLY ORGANIZED AS THE SAINT PAUL CHRISTIAN METHODIST EPISCOPAL CHURCH. ACCORDING TO LOCAL TRADITION, THE CONGREGATION CHOSE TO NAME THEIR CHURCH FOR SAINT PAUL BECAUSE OF HIS HISTORICALLY SIGNIFICANT MISSIONARY UNDERTAKINGS. LED BY THE REV. E.A. STRONG, A NEW WOOD FRAME CHURCH BUILDING WAS CONSTRUCTED  HERE IN 1945. GROWTH IN THE CONGREGATION'S MEMBERSHIP PROMPTED THE BUILDING OF A NEW BRICK SANCTUARY AT THIS SITE IN 1969. A NEW PARSONAGE WAS PURCHASED IN 1989, AND IN 1989-90 THE CONGREGATION PURCHASED TWO ADJOINING LOTS FOR FUTURE EXPANSION PURPOSES. THE CONGREGATION SPONSORS SEVERAL CHURCH PROGRAMS INCLUDING A SUNDAY SCHOOL TEACHING PROGRAM, BIBLE STUDY, CHRISTIAN YOUTH FELLOWSHIP AND YOUNG ADULT FELLOWSHIP. ITS MISSIONARY SOCIETY, WHICH INCLUDES THE ANNIE ROSE CIRCLE, WILLIE GREEN CIRCLE, AND YOUTH CIRCLE, PROVIDES RELIGIOUS GUIDANCE FOR THE COMMUNITY.

LOCATION:  1201 N. 4th STREET, ORANGE

 

 

SITE OF WORLD WAR II POW CAMP

DURING WORLD WAR II, OVER 50,000 GERMAN PRISONERS OF WAR WERE INTERNED IN THE TEXAS POW CAMPS. DETAILED FROM THE BASE CAMP AT HUNTSVILLE (AND LATER FROM CAMPS AT CHINA, TEXAS AND EDGERLY, LOUISIANA), ABOUT 140 GERMAN PRISONERS WERE HOUSED IN A US ARMY TENT CAMP NEAR THIS SITE IN 1944 AND 1945. THEY WORKED AS LABORERS IN AREA RICE FIELDS, HELPING TO BRING IN THE HARVEST OF FARMERS WHOSE WORKERS HAD GONE TO WAR. TRANSPORTED TO THEIR WORK DETAILS BY ARMY TRUCKS EACH DAY, THE PRISONERS BECAME A CRUCIAL ELEMENT IN THE AREA'S WARTIME FOOD PRODUCTION.

LOCATION: 1 MI. W OF ORANGE ON US 90 R-O-W AT WOMACK RD.

 

 

THE HOWELL-LINSCOMB HOME

DANIEL WEBSTER HOWELL (1855-1930), A CARPENTER AND CONTRACTOR, BUILT THIS TWO-STORY GALLERIED RESIDENCE IN 1900-03 FOR HIS WIFE AMANDA (SELLERS) (1857-1924) AND THEIR TEN CHILDREN.  IN 1918 THEY SOLD THE HOUSE TO MILAM L. LINSCOMB, A LOCAL BARBER, AND HIS WIFE SELTIA. THEY RESIDED HERE WITH THEIR TWO CHILDREN UNTIL 1927. REPRESENTATIVE OF THE EARLY DAYS OF ORANGE'S GROWTH AS A LUMBER CENTER, THE ORNATE VICTORIAN HOME FEATURES INTRICATE GINGERBREAD DETAILING.

LOCATION: 1212 W. PINE ST., ORANGE

 

 

SAMUEL WALLACE SHOLARS, MD

(OCT. 15, 1847-MAY 13, 1926)A NATIVE OF TALLADEGA, ALABAMA, SAMUEL SHOLARS MOVED WITH HIS PARENTS TO JASPER COUNTY IN 1858. A CONFEDERATE ARMY VETERAN, DR. SHOLARS RECEIVED HIS MEDICAL DEGREE IN 1872. HE PRACTICED MEDICINE IN ORANGE, FOUNDED SHOLARS DRUGSTORE, SERVED AS ALDERMAN, SCHOOL BOARD MEMBER AND PRESIDENT OF THE SOUTHEAST TEXAS MEDICAL SOCIETY. HE HELPED ORGANIZE THE ORANGE RIFLES OF THE TEXAS VOLUNTEER GUARDS. HIS DAUGHTER AND THREE SONS WERE ALSO CIVIC LEADERS.

LOCATION:  EVERGREEN CEMETERY, BORDER & JACKSON ST. , ORANGE

 

 

WOODMEN OF THE WORLD LODGE BUILDING

PHOENIX CAMP NO. 32, WOODMEN OF THE WORLD, WAS ORGANIZED IN ORANGE IN 1891.  BY 1915, THE YEAR THIS BUILDING WAS COMPLETED, THE ORGANIZATION BOASTED A MEMBERSHIP OF 385. LODGE MEETINGS WERE HELD ON THE SECOND FLOOR OF THIS STRUCTURE, WHILE THE FIRST FLOOR WAS RENTED TO A VARIETY OF LOCAL BUSINESSES.  BUILT AT A COST OF $2,800, THE FOURSQUARE BUILDING FEATURES A SIMPLE MISSION REVIVAL PARAPET, HIPPED ROOF, AND BRACKET-SUPPORTED BALCONY.

LOCATION: 110 S. BORDER ST., ORANGE

 

 

THE ORANGE LEADER

TRACING ITS ORIGINS TO 1875, THIS NEWSPAPER HAS SERVED ORANGE FOR OVER A CENTURY. IT BEGAN AS "THE ORANGE WEEKLY TRIBUNE" OPERATED BY A.P. HARRIS, GENERAL MERCANTILE MERCHANT. THROUGH SUBSEQUENT OWNERS AND MERGERS WITH OTHER NEWSPAPERS, THE MASTHEAD UNDERWENT SEVERAL NAME CHANGES, INCLUDING "THE ORANGE LEADER", "THE ORANGE LEADER  AND WEEKLY TRIBUNE", "THE ORANGE DAILY TRIBUNE", "THE CITIZEN-RECORD CONSOLIDATED", AND "THE ORANGE LEADER" AGAIN.  OVER THE YEARS THE NEWSPAPER HAS KEPT THE COMMUNITY INFORMED ON MATTERS OF LOCAL, STATE, NATIONAL, AND INTERNATIONAL CONCERN.

LOCATION:  200 W. FRONT, ORANGE

 

 

ST. PAUL'S EPISCOPAL CHURCH

THIS CHURCH WAS ESTABLISHED IN 1863 UNDER THE LEADERSHIP OF THE REV. JOSEPH WOOD DUNN, AN AREA MISSIONARY. THE EARLIEST SERVICES WERE CONDUCTED IN THE HOME OF JEROME SWINFORD. HIS MOTHER-IN-LAW MARY W. TRUMBLE LATER DONATED LAND AT THE CORNER OF FOURTH AND MAIN FOR CONSTRUCTION OF THE FIRST CHURCH BUILDING. THE WOMEN'S GUILD PROVIDED FUNDS FOR THE GROWING MISSION BY SELLING CAKES AND SERVING MEALS.  IN 1920, DURING THE PASTORATE OF THE REV. EDGAR N. LEBLANC, ST. PAUL'S BECAME A PARISH.  SINCE THE 1860's, THE CHURCH HAS BEEN ACTIVE IN THE DEVELOPMENT OF ORANGE.

LOCATION: 1401 W. PARK AVENUE, ORANGE

 

 

CHARLES HOLMES SAXON

(ABOUT 1820-JAN. 26, 1919)A NATIVE OF MISSISSIPPI, CHARLES HOLMES SAXON MIGRATED TO TEXAS IN 1842, SETTLING IN
JASPER COUNTY. FOLLOWING HIS SERVICE IN THE WAR, HE MOVED TO THIS AREA, WHERE HE WAS A FARMER, A SHINGLE MAKER AND AN ACTIVE MASON. WHEN ORANGE COUNTY WAS ORGANIZED IN 1852, HE SERVED ON THE FIRST COMMISSIONERS COURT AND LATER BECAME SHERIFF.  SAXON ENLISTED FOR SERVICE IN THE CIVIL WAR AND PARTICIPATED IN ACTION IN TEXAS, NEW MEXICO AND LOUISIANA.

  LOCATION: EVERGREEN CEMETERY, JACKSON AND BORDER STS., ORANGE

 

 

THE EMMETT BEUHLER HOUSE

EMMETT BEUHLER (1853-1943), A NATIVE OF ALSACE-LORRAINE, CAME HERE IN THE 1880's, DURING THE LUMBERING BOOM. WITH L. MILLER, WHO CAME FROM GERMANY, HE ESTABLISHED A CYPRESS SHINGLE MILL. THEY BUILT A RAILROAD TO THE MILL, AND HAD 75 MEN ON THEIR PAYROLL. BEUHLER ERECTED THIS VICTORIAN COTTAGE ABOUT 1890 AS HIS RESIDENCE, USING CYPRESS AND YELLOW PINE, WITH RARE CURLY PINE TRIM.  HE BUILT THREE ROOMS UPSTAIRS AND THREE DOWN.  IN 1904, THE BEUHLERS MOVED TO LOUISIANA.  AFTER OTHERS HAD OWNED AND MODIFIED THE PROPERTY, IT WAS BOUGHT IN 1955 BY THE R.B. JOHNSON FAMILY, WHO PRESERVE IT.

LOCATION: 701 W. CYPRESS AVE., ORANGE

 

 

JOHN COLE HOLMSTEAD

PIONEER AREA SETTLER JOHN COLE HOLMSTEAD (1805-75) MIGRATED TO TEXAS IN 1828. AFTER LIVING IN THE COW BAYOU COMMUNITY, HE MOVED TO A NEARBY SITE (0.5 MI.NW), LATER PART OF A LAND GRANT HE RECEIVED IN 1848. A VETERAN OF THE LOCAL MILITIA DURING THE TEXAS REVOLUTION, COLE BECAME A SUCCESSFUL CATTLEMAN IN THE NORTHERN ORANGE COUNTY AND SOUTHERN JASPER COUNTY AREA. THE WIDESPREAD COMMUNITY THAT DEVELOPED AROUND HIS LAND FROM 1830 TO 1902 BECAME KNOWN AS THE COLE SETTLEMENT. JOHN COLE DIED IN 1875 AND WAS BURIED IN THE FAMILY CEMETERY ON HIS ORIGINAL HOMESTEAD.

LOCATION: FM 2801, 2 MI. W. OF INTERSECTION WITH FM 62, 20 MI. N. OF ORANGE

 

 

DAVID ROBERT WINGATE
(1819-1899)

IN 1852 WEALTHY MISSISSIPPI SAWMILL OWNER DAVID ROBERT WINGATE MOVED HIS FAMILY TO A LARGE COTTON PLANTATION IN NEWTON COUNTY. DURING THE CIVIL WAR (1861-65), HE DONATED LUMBER FROM HIS SABINE PASS SAWMILL TO BUILD FORT SABINE AND OTHER POSTS. FEDERAL TROOPS BURNED HIS HOME AND BUSINESS. IN 1874 HE RELOCATED IN ORANGE, BOUGHT INTO A SAWMILL, AND BRANCHED INTO RICE FARMING. WINGATE SERVED AS COUNTY JUDGE IN NEWTON AND ORANGE COUNTIES. ALTHOUGH PLAGUED WITH FIRES AND DISASTERS, JUDGE WINGATE REBUILT HIS HOLDINGS AND CONTINUED TO HELP OTHERS.

LOCATION: EVERGREEN CEMETERY, JACKSON AND BORDER ST., ORANGE

 

 

W.H. STARK HOUSE

EASTLAKE DETAILING DECORATES THE PORCHES AND GABLES OF THIS ORNATE QUEEN ANNE STYLE RESIDENCE, BUILT IN 1893-94 FOR WILLIAM HENRY (1851-1936) AND MIRIAM (LUTCHER)(1859-1936) STARK. A FINANCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL PIONEER, STARK HEADED SEVERAL LUMBER AND PETROLEUM COMPANIES. HIS SON H.J. LUTCHER STARK (1887-1965) WAS NOTED FOR HIS CULTURAL AND EDUCATIONAL PHILANTHROPIES. BOTH MEN SERVED AS REGENTS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS. THE NELDA C. AND H.J. LUTCHER STARK FOUNDATION RESTORED THE HOUSE.

LOCATION: 611 W. GREEN AVE., ORANGE

 

 

EMMA GEORGE LATCHEM
(JULY 15, 1854-MAR. 27, 1929)

BORN IN QUITMAN, TEXAS, EMMA (GEORGE) LATCHEM CAME TO ORANGE IN 1871 AFTER HER HUSBAND DIED. MRS. LATCHEM BEGAN TEACHING IN 1873 IN A PRIVATE SCHOOL.  SHE JOINED THE PUBLIC SCHOOL SYSTEM WHEN IT OPENED IN 1884. DEVOTED TO TEACHING, SHE HELPED FOUND THE MOTHERS AND TEACHERS CLUB IN 1908 WHICH WORKED TO IMPROVE CLASSROOM CONDITIONS. SHE WAS A CHARTER MEMBER OF THE EASTERN STAR. AFTER 42 YEARS OF TEACHING, SHE RETIRED IN 1915.

LOCATION: EVERGREEN CEMETERY, JACKSON AND BORDER ST., ORANGE

 

 

CLAIBORNE WEST
(1800-1866)

BORN IN FRANKLIN COUNTY, TENNESSEE, CLAIBORNE WEST MOVED AS A YOUNG MAN TO LOUISIANA. HE MARRIED ANNA GARNER IN 1824 AND THEY HAD NINE CHILDREN. HIS FAMILY IMMIGRATED TO THIS AREA IN 1825 AND RECEIVED A LAND GRANT IN THE COW BAYOU SETTLEMENT. SOON WEST JOINED IN THE STRUGGLE FOR INDEPENDENCE FROM MEXICO. AS ONE OF THE REPRESENTATIVES FROM LIBERTY MUNICIPALITY, HE ATTENDED THE 1832 CONVENTION AND THE 1835 CONSULTATION AT SAN FELIPE DE AUSTIN.  WEST WAS RESPONSIBLE FOR THE DESIGNATION OF COW BAYOU AS JEFFERSON MUNICIPALITY, THE FORERUNNER OF JEFFERSON AND LATER ORANGE COUNTY. HE SERVED AS A REPRESENTATIVE FROM THE MUNICIPALITY TO THE GENERAL COUNCIL AND ACTED AS LOCAL POSTMASTER. AT THE GENERAL CONVENTION AT WASHINGTON ON THE BRAZOS ON MARCH 2, 1836, WEST WAS ONE OF 58 SIGNERS OF THE TEXAS DECLARATION OF INDEPENDENCE. HE HELPED DRAFT THE REPUBLIC OF TEXAS CONSTITUTION. FROM JULY TO OCTOBER, 1836, WEST SERVED IN FRANKLIN HARDIN'S COMPANY OF VOLUNTEERS. HE THEN SERVED IN THE FIRST CONGRESS OF THE REPUBLIC OF TEXAS. WEST MOVED FROM HERE TO MONTGOMERY COUNTY AND LATER SETTLED IN SEGUIN. HE WAS BURIED IN THE RIVERSIDE CEMETERY AT SEGUIN.

 LOCATION: CLAIBORNE WEST PARK, IH 10, 10 MI. W. OF ORANGE

 

 

HUGH OCHILTREE
(JULY 10, 1820-MARCH 28, 1891)

A NATIVE OF NORTH CAROLINA, HUGH OCHILTREE MIGRATED TO TEXAS IN 1840. SETTLING FIRST IN NACOGDOCHES, HE STUDIED LAW IN THE OFFICE OF HIS COUSIN WILLIAM BECK OCHILTREE, WHO BECAME A PROMINENT JUSTICE AND TEXAS STATESMAN. IN 1843 HE MOVED TO SAN AUGUSTINE, WHERE HE MARRIED MARGARET ANN MCKNIGHT. DURING THE MEXICAN WAR, OCHILTREE VOLUNTEERED FOR SERVICE AND PARTICIPATED IN THE BATTLE OF MONTERREY. SHORTLY AFTER THE WAR HE MOVED TO SABINE PASS AND OPERATED A WAREHOUSE BUSINESS WITH JOHN G. BERRY. IN 1852 OCHILTREE MOVED TO MADISON, NOW ORANGE. HERE HE ESTABLISHED A MERCANTILE AND LATER DEVELOPED A COMMISSION BUSINESS IN COTTON, SUGAR, AND MOLASSES. HIS WIFE DIED IN 1855 AND THE FOLLOWING YEAR HE WED MARY JOSEPHINE SHAW.  AN ACTIVE MASON AND A CHARTER MEMBER OF MADISON LODGE NO. 126, OCHILTREE WAS ALSO A LEADER IN PUBLIC SERVICE. HE SERVED AS MADISON'S FIRST POSTMASTER, AS AN ORANGE COUNTY COMMISSIONER, AND AS COUNTY CLERK. IN ADDITION, HE WAS INSTRUMENTAL IN THE SUPPORT OF DEEP WATER PORTS ON THE SABINE AND NECHES RIVERS. DURING THE CIVIL WAR HE WAS PROVOST MARSHAL OF ORANGE. HIS ACTIVE LEADERSHIP WAS VITAL TO THE EARLY GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT OF THE CITY.

 LOCATION: OCHILTREE PARK, FRONT ST., BETWEEN 3rd AND 4th, ORANGE

 

 

SAMUEL H. LEVINGSTON

A NATIVE OF NORTHERN IRELAND, SAMUEL H. LEVINGSTON WAS BORN IN 1832, THE SON OF GEORGE AND MARGARET LEVINGSTON. AT THE AGE OF FOURTEEN HE LEFT IRELAND WITH HIS BROTHERS, DAVID AND JOHN, AND HIS SISTER, MARGARET. THEY SETTLED IN APALACHICOLA, FLORIDA, WHERE SAMUEL LEVINGSTON WORKED AS A SHIP CARPENTER. THERE IN 1852 HE MARRIED ASENATHA MOORE. SHORTLY BEFORE THE CIVIL WAR BEGAN, THE LEVINGSTONS MOVED TO THE AREA NEAR WHAT IS NOW THE CITY OF ORANGE AND ESTABLISHED A SHIPYARD ON THE SABINE RIVER. SAMUEL LEVINGSTON SERVED THE CONFEDERATE FORCES DURING THE CIVIL WAR AS A SHIP CARPENTER AND A BLOCKADE RUNNER. AFTER THE WAR, HE RETURNED TO ORANGE AND BEGAN ANOTHER SHIPYARD, BUILDING PADDLE WHEEL BOATS FOR HAULING COTTON AND FARM PRODUCTS ON THE SABINE RIVER BETWEEN ORANGE AND LOGANSLPORT, LA. UPON HIS RETIREMENT HIS SON GEORGE TOOK OVER THE BUSINESS AND DEVELOPED IT INTO THE LEVINGSTON SHIPBUILDING COMPANY. AN ACTIVE CIVIC LEADER IN ORANGE, SAMUEL LEVINGSTON WAS INVOLVED IN THE MADISON MASONIC LODGE AND HELPED FOUND THE FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH. FROM 1871 UNTIL 1891 HE AND HIS FAMILY LIVED ON AN 11-ACRE TRACT OF LAND THAT LATER BECAME THIS CITY PARK. LEVINGSTON DIED IN 1911 AND IS BURIED IN ORANGE'S EVERGREEN CEMETERY.

LOCATION: LEVINGSTON PARK, LEVINGSTON AND MOSS STS., ORANGE

 

 

GEORGE ALEXANDER PATTILLO

A VETERAN OF THE WAR OF 1812, GEORGIA NATIVE GEORGE ALEXANDER PATTILLO (1796-1871) MIGRATED TO THIS AREA IN THE EARLY 1830's. HE SERVED ON THE LOCAL COMMITTEE OF CORRESPONDENCE CREATED BY THE CONVENTION OF 1832 AND ON THE GENERAL COUNCIL OF THE PROVISIONAL GOVERNMENT ESTABLISHED BY THE CONSULTATION OF 1835. DURING THE TEXAS REVOLUTION OF 1836, PATTILLO, WHO HAD EARLIER RECEIVED A MEXICAN LAND GRANT, JOINED WITH OTHER AREA SETTLERS TO AID THE TEXAS ARMY. ARRIVING AT SAN JACINTO THE DAY AFTER THE DECISIVE BATTLE, HE WAS COMMISSIONED BY TEXAS PRESIDENT DAVID G. BURNET TO DIRECT THE FORMATION OF JEFFERSON COUNTY, WHICH INCLUDED THIS AREA. HE ALSO BECAME AN ASSOCIATE JUSTICE FOR THE NEW COUNTY AND WAS A POSTMASTER FOR THE SETTLEMENT OF PATTILLO'S STATION, LATER THE TERRY COMMUNITY OF CENTRAL ORANGE COUNTY. IN THE EARLY 1840's PATTILLO SERVED THIS AREA AS A REPRESENTATIVE AND A SENATOR IN THE REPUBLIC OF TEXAS CONGRESS, WHERE HE ACTIVELY SUPPORTED ANNEXATION TO THE UNITED STATES. IN 1852 HE WAS ELECTED THE FIRST MASONIC LEADER IN SOUTHEAST TEXAS. PATTILLO DIED IN 1871 AND WAS BURIED IN A FAMILY PLOT AT BUNN'S BLUFF ON THE NECHES RIVER, WHERE HE HAD LIVED SINCE 1844.

  LOCATION:

 

 

MOUNT ZION MISSIONARY BAPTIST CHURCH

THE EARLIEST KNOWN BLACK CONGREGATION IN ORANGE, MOUNT ZION MISSIONARY BAPTIST CHURCH WAS STARTED IN 1871 AS A RESULT OF THE ORGANIZATIONAL EFFORTS BEGUN BY SIMON JONES, PETER MINOR, AND WILLIAM RUBEN MINOR. JOINED LATER BY WILLIAM EDWARDS, BOYD SCOTT, ARTHUR ROBINSON, AND JOHN WILLIAMS, THEY RAISED FUNDS FOR THE CONSTRUCTION OF A CHURCH BUILDING. COMPLETED IN 1872, THE FIRST SANCTUARY WAS A SMALL FRAME STRUCTURE ON THE CORNER OF THIRD AND CHERRY STREETS. IN WAS LATER MOVED TO JOHN STREET AND ENLARGED. THE CONGREGATION WAS OFFICIALLY ORGANIZED AT A MEETING IN OCTOBER 1873. THE DEDICATION CEREMONY WAS CONDUCTED BY THE REV. ARCHIE VINERABLE AND THE REV. A.J. SHOTWELL OF BEAUMONT. SEVERAL OTHER SANCTUARIES SERVED THE MEMBERS BEFORE THE PRESENT BRICK BUILDING WAS CONSTRUCTED IN 1926. DESIGNED BY DR. C.E. JETER, IT WAS COMPLETED DURING THE PASTORATE OF THE REV. W.J. CLARK. THE MOUNT ZION CONGREGATION HAS BEEN INSTRUMENTAL IN THE DEVELOPMENT OF THE COMMUNITY, SPONSORING MISSIONARY PROGRAMS AND SERVING AS A NUCLEUS FOR HE FORMATION OF SEVERAL CHURCHES. MANY PROMINENT AREA LEADERS HAVE BEEN MEMBERS HERE.

 

LOCATION:  512 W. JOHN, ORANGE

 

 

ABRAHAM WINFREE
(1801-1865)

A NATIVE OF LOUISIANA, ABRAHAM WINFREE FIRST CAME TO PRESENT ORANGE COUNTY IN 1830. HE PURCHASED LAND BY 1831, AND IN 1833 BROUGHT HIS WIFE MILLE AND THEIR FIVE CHILDREN TO TEXAS. THEIR HOMESTEAD ON COW BAYOU WAS NEAR THE OPELOUSAS TRAIL (LA BAHIA ROAD), AN IMPORTANT EARLY TEXAS TRAVEL ROUTE.  WINFREE MADE HIS LIVING AS A RANCHER, CATTLE DRIVER, SHINGLE MAKER, AND LOGGER. THE WINFREE HOME WAS THE SITE OF AN ELECTION IN NOVEMBER 1836 IN WHICH CLAIBORNE WEST WAS ELECTED TO REPRESENT LOCAL CITIZENS IN THE CONGRESS OF THE REPUBLIC OF TEXAS. THE FOLLOWING YEAR, WINFREE WAS APPOINTED COUNTY COMMISSIONER FOR HIS PRECINCT.  EVENTUALLY, THE COMMUNITY THAT GREW UP IN THIS AREA BECAME KNOWN AS WINFREE.  ABRAHAM WINFREE DIED IN 1865 AND WAS BURIED ON HIS HOMESTEAD IN THE SAME FAMILY GRAVEYARD WHERE HIS WIFE MILLIE WAS INTERRED. HE REQUESTED THAT NO STONE BE PLACED ON HIS GRAVE, AND IT REMAINS UNMARKED. THE CEMETERY BECAME KNOWN AS WINFREE NO.1 AFTER ANOTHER FAMILY GRAVEYARD WAS ESTABLISHED IN THE AREA. WINFREE DESCENDANTS CONTINUE TO RESIDE IN ORANGE COUNTY. THE COMMUNITY WHICH STILL BEARS HIS NAME IS TESTIMONY TO THE LIFE OF THIS PIONEER TEXAS SETTLER.

LOCATION: MITCHELL LANE, 1 MI. N OF WINFREE RD, ORANGE

 

 

ALEXANDER GILMER

(SEPT. 7, 1829-JULY 30, 1906) A NATIVE OF IRELAND, ALEXANDER "SANDY" GILMER CAME TO THE UNITED STATES IN 1846 AT THE AGE OF SEVENTEEN. SETTLING FIRST IN GEORGIA, HE WORKED FOR HIS BROTHER JOHN, WHO HAD A CONTRACT TO SUPPLY SHIP MASTS TO THE FRENCH GOVERNMENT. LATER THE BROTHERS CONSTRUCTED A STEAMBOAT FOR USE ON THE CHATTAHOOCHEE RIVER. IN THE LATE 1840's GILMER CAME TO TEXAS AND ENTERED THE SHIPBUILDING BUSINESS IN ORANGE IN ASSOCIATION WITH HIS COUSIN GEORGE C. GILMER. TOGETHER THEY LATER OPENED A LOCAL MERCANTILE. DURING THE CIVIL WAR, GILMER SERVED AS A CONFEDERATE BLOCKADE RUNNER. THROUGH HIS EFFORTS, LOCAL COTTON AND LUMBER WERE EXCHANGED FOR MUCH NEEDED SUPPLIES. IN 1863 HE PARTICIPATED IN THE BATTLE OF SABINE PASS. AFTER THE WAR, GILMER STARTED A SAWMILL IN ORANGE. DESPITE A SERIES OF FIRES WHICH DESTROYED FOUR OF HIS MILLS BY 1899, GILMER BECAME A LEADING LUMBERMAN OF THE AREA. HIS LATER HOLDINGS INCLUDED MILLS AT LEMONVILLE AND THE JASPER COUNTY TOWN OF REMLIG (GILMER SPELLED BACKWARD) AND THE TIMBERLAND THROUGHOUT THE COASTAL PRAIRIE OF TEXAS. GILMER DIED IN 1906 WHILE ON A BUSINESS TRIP TO NEW YORK CITY. TWICE MARRIED, HE WAS THE FATHER OF NINE CHILDREN BY HIS SECOND WIFE CLEORA C. THOMAS OF ORANGE.

LOCATION: EVERGREEN CEMETERY, BORDER AND JACKSON STS., ORANGE

 

ORANGE CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

THE ORANGE CHAMBER OF COMMERCE TRACES ITS HISTORY TO AN 1887 CITIZENS' COMMITTEE THAT WAS FORMED TO PROMOTE THE AREA'S BUSINESS POTENTIAL. A REORGANIZATION OF THE COMMITTEE RESULTED IN THE FORMATION OF THE CITY'S BOARD OF TRADE IN 1899. A FURTHER STEP IN THE EVOLUTION OF THE CHAMBER OF COMMERCE TOOK PLACE IN 1902 WITH THE ESTABLISHMENT OF THE PROGRESSIVE LEAGUE OF ORANGE. COMPRISED OF REPRESENTATIVES OF LEADING MANUFACTURING INSTITUTIONS AND BUSINESSES, THE LEAGUE ALSO INCLUDED PROFESSIONALS AND INDIVIDUALS NOT DIRECTLY INVOLVED IN THE BUSINESS WORLD. CONCERNED WITH THE GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT OF THE CITY, LEAGUE MEMBERS
UNDERTOOK PROJECTS FOR BETTER ROADS, A DEEP WATER CANAL, AND AN OPERA HOUSE, AND A BEGAN A CAMPAIGN TO ATTRACT INVESTORS TO ORANGE. BETWEEN 1918 AND 1922, THE ORANGE CHAMBER OF COMMERCE WAS ORGANIZED FROM A CONSOLIDATION OF ITS PREDECESSORS.  OVER THE YEARS, THE CHAMBER HAS WORKED SUCCESSFULLY TO STIMULATE BUSINESS IN THE COUNTY. THE INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT COMMITTEE OF THE
CHAMBER OF COMMERCE WAS FORMED IN 1947 TO BRING CHEMICAL PLANTS INTO THE AREA. 
TODAY THE ORANGE CHAMBER OF COMMERCE IS RECOGNIZED AS AN IMPORTANT ELEMENT IN THE TOWN'S COMMERCIAL HERITAGE.

 LOCATION: 1012 W. GREEN AVE., ORANGE
 

 

SITE OF END OF THE LINE STATION

THE ORIGINAL CHARTER FOR A RAIL LINE THROUGH THE ORANGE AREA WAS GRANTED TO THE SABINE AND GALVESTON RAILROAD AND LUMBER COMPANY IN 1856. ABOUT THE SAME TIME THE NEW ORLEANS, OPELOUSAS AND GREAT WESTERN RAILROAD COMPANY WAS BUILDING A LINE WEST FROM THE MISSISSIPPI RIVER. THE LOUISIANA LEGISLATURE LATER ENDORSED A PLAN TO JOIN TEXAS IN THE COMPLETION OF THE TRADE ROUTE BETWEEN THE STATES. THE TWO COMPANIES WERE REORGANIZED AS SEPARATE DIVISIONS OF THE TEXAS AND NEW ORLEANS RAILROAD. THE TEXAS DIVISION COMPLETED CONSTRUCTION TO THIS SITE BEFORE THE CIVIL WAR. SINCE THE RAIL LINE STOPPED AT THE SABINE RIVER, THE FIRST DEPOT IN ORANGE WAS KNOWN AS THE END OF THE LINE STATION. TRAINS UNLOADED CARGO HERE FOR TRANSFER TO RIVERBOATS AND OCEAN FREIGHTERS. SECTIONS OF THE LINE REMAINED IN OPERATION DURING THE CIVIL WAR, BUT NEARBY RAILS WERE USED TO BUILD CONFEDERATE FORTIFICATIONS AT SABINE PASS (34 MI. SW). THE INTERSTATE ROUTE WAS COMPLETED IN 1881 UNDER THE DIRECTION OF CHARLES MORGAN, A STEAMSHIP LINE OWNER. THE FIRST STATION, DAMAGED BY AN 1885 STORM, WAS REPLACED BY A LARGER FACILITY WITH RIVER LOADING DOCKS. THE SOUTHERN PACIFIC RAILROAD LATER TOOK OVER THE T. & N.O. LINE AND BUILT A NEW DEPOT IN 1908.

LOCATION: 3rd AND FRONT ST., ORANGE

 

 

JOHN HARMON

BORN IN 1790 IN ST. MARTIN PARISH, LOUISIANA, JOHN HARMON LIVED AT POSTE DE ATTAKAPAS, A SPANISH FORTIFICATION AT THE PRESENT SITE OF ST. MARTINVILLE.  A VETERAN OF THE STATE'S DEFENSIVE ACTIONS DURING THE WAR OF 1812, HE WED ELIZABETH COMPSTOCK CLARKS IN 1813.  SOON AFTER THE BIRTH OF THEIR FIRST CHILD IN 1816, THE HARMONS SOLD THEIR ST. MARTIN PARISH LAND AND MOVED WEST. ALTHOUGH NOT MUCH IS KNOWN ABOUT THEIR ACTIVITIES OVER THE FOLLOWING DECADE, IT IS KNOWN THEY HAD SETTLED ALONG THE EASTERN BANK OF THE SABINE RIVER BY 1826. THE NEXT YEAR, HARMON DECIDED TO RELOCATE IN THIS AREA. HE BUILT A MASSIVE RAFT OF CYPRESS LOGS WHICH TRANSPORTED A HOUSE, A WAGON, A PAIR OF OXEN, A HORSE, A COW, FARM TOOLS AND SUPPLIES, AN HIS FAMILY, WHICH NUMBERED FIVE. THE HARMON FAMILY RAFT ARRIVED HERE ON JANUARY 1, 1828. WEARY FROM THEIR JOURNEY, THE FAMILY FEASTED ON WILD GAME AND LATER DECIDED TO MAKE THEIR HOME IN THE AREA. THEIR ARRIVAL AT THE PRESENT SITE OF ORANGE MARKED THE BEGINNING OF PERMANENT SETTLEMENT. LATER, WHEN THE TOWN DEVELOPED, JOHN HARMON WAS A SADDLER, A CIVIC LEADER, AND A PROMINENT LANDOWNER. HE DIED IN 1874, BUT HIS CONTRIBUTIONS AND PIONEER SPIRIT REMAIN VITAL TO THE AREA'S HERITAGE.

LOCATION: SABINE RIVER AT FOURTH ST., ORANGE

 

WILLIAM WILLIAMSON
(1829-1900)

THIS COMMUNITY BEGAN IN 1867 WHEN LOUISIANA NATIVE WILLIAM WILLIAMSON AND HIS WIFE JOISSINE DESMARAIS BOUGHT SQUATTERS RIGHTS AND A LOG HOUSE ON THIS TRACT OF PUBLIC LAND. THEIR HOME SERVED AS THE COMMUNITY GATHERING PLACE FOR SOCIALS AND CHURCH MEETINGS. AFTER THE DEATH OF THEIR SON ABSOLOM IN 1890, THE WILLIAMSON CEMETERY (1.3 MI. N) WAS SET ASIDE. VITALLY INTERESTED IN EDUCATOIN, WILLIAMSON SERVED AS A SCHOOL TRUSTEE AS DID SEVERAL OF HIS 15 CHILDREN AND THEIR DESCENDANTS. IN 1900 WILLIAMSON AND HIS WIFE WERE BAPTIZED INTO THE CHURCH OF JESUS CHRIST OF LATTER-DAY SAINTS. THIS MARKED THE BEGINNING OF MORMONISM IN THIS AREA. THE FIRST CHURCH HOUSE OF PINE LOGS WAS ERECTED ABOUT 1901 BY VOLUNTEERS. IN 1915 A FRAME BUILDING WAS CONSTRUCTED HERE ON AN ACRE OF LAND DONATED BY WILLIAMSON'S SON JOSEPH (1 MI. N). SIGNS OF THE WILLIAMSON INFLUENCE IN THE COMMUNITY INCLUDE: AN EARLY SCHOOL AND A MAJOR ROAD BEARING THE NAME; THE ANNUAL JULY 24th COMMEMORATION OF THE MORMON'S ARRIVAL IN THE SALT LAKE VALLEY; THE PUBLIC CEMETERY WHICH HAS ABOUT 650 GRAVES; THE FAMILY GENEALOGICAL ASSOCIATION; AND THIS CHURCH BUILDING WHICH IS LOCATED AT THE CENTER OF THE COMMUNITY.

LOCATION: FM 105 AND AUNT SADIE DR., 8 MI. N OF VIDOR

 

 

MADISON LODGE NO. 126, A.F. & A.M.

HUGH OCHILTREE (1820-91), GEORGE A. PATTILLO (1796-1871), AND OTHER LEADING CITIZENS ORGANIZED THIS LODGE ON APRIL 30, 1853. COL. OCHILTREE HAD COME TO TEXAS IN 1839, FOUGHT IN THE MEXICAN WAR, AND HELPED DEVELOP THE TOWN OF MADISON (NOW ORANGE). PATTILLO SETTLED IN THE COUNTY IN 1830, WAS A LOCAL OFFICIAL OF THE MEXICAN COLONY OF TEXAS, A REPUBLIC OF TEXAS CONGRESSMAN, AND A VETERAN PUBLIC LEADER. THE LODGE WAS CHARTERED UNDER THE NAME BY WHICH THE TOWN OF ORANGE WAS KNOWN FROM 1845 TO 1858. OFFICERS FOR THE FIRST YEAR WERE WILLIAM SMITH, WORSHIPFUL MASTER; PATTILLO, SENIOR WARDEN; OCHILTREE, JUNIOR WARDEN; A.H. READING, SECRETARY; I.H. HUTCHINGS, TREASURER; S. FAIRCHILDS, SENIOR DEACON; N. SMITH, JUNIOR DEACON; CHARLES SAXON, TILER. MADISON LODGE SPONSORED THE TOWN'S FIRST PUBLIC SCHOOL, 1854-1879, PROVIDING HOUSING ON THE GROUND FLOOR OF THE LODGE HALL  WHERE CHURCH SERVICES WERE ALSO HELD FOR A NUMBER OF YEARS. IN 1865, A HURRICANE DESTROYED THE ORIGINAL LODGE BUILDING. A SECOND WAS ERECTED IN 1878. THE PRESENT BUILDING, WITH BANQUET ROOM, OFFICES, AND OTHER APPOINTMENTS, WAS COMPLETED IN AUGUST OF 1926. MOVED FROM SECOND LODGE SITE AT 5th AND ELM AFTER SALE OF PROPERTY TO NEW, BUT CONTINUING LOCATION OF ORIGINAL MADISON LODGE #126, A.F. & A.M.

LOCATION:  2835 SOUTH ST. , ORANGE